10 Local Stories of the Week | Jackson Free Press | Jackson, MS

10 Local Stories of the Week

Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood, the Democratic nominee for governor, watches while an aid plays an education ad from Republican opponent Tate Reeves that Hood calls "fraudulent." Photo by Ashton Pittman.

Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood, the Democratic nominee for governor, watches while an aid plays an education ad from Republican opponent Tate Reeves that Hood calls "fraudulent." Photo by Ashton Pittman.

There's never a slow news week in Jackson, Miss., and last week was no exception. Here are the local stories JFP reporters brought you in case you missed them:

  1. The Faculty Senate of the University of Mississippi passed a resolution late Thursday night declaring "no confidence" in the Institutions of Higher Learning board's search process to find a replacement chancellor for the university, and no confidence in IHL itself "by reason of its conduct in connection with that search process."
  2. If you've been reading Seyma Bayram's coverage of the Hinds County Board of Supervisors and my previous Friday columns, you know that she was shocked to discover that the county voted one month ago to destroy a long list of documents spanning 23 years.
  3. Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood, the Democratic candidate for governor, charged that his Republican opponent Tate Reeves, who as lieutenant governor for the past eight years also served as president of the Mississippi Senate, pursued a legislative agenda that aligned with that of his high-dollar campaign donors.
  4. EMILY's List, a Washington, D.C.-based group dedicated to helping elect more women to offices nationwide, on Tuesday endorsed Democrat Jennifer Riley Collins in the Mississippi attorney general's race.
  5. Education is the No. 1 issue for Mississippi House Rep. Jay Hughes, the Democratic nominee for lieutenant governor this year, who has taught in public schools himself. He talked about the conversations he has had with teachers and other Mississippians this year about the issues that keep them up at night—and how he hopes to address them.
  6. The dehumanization of people of color affects everyone. Often the narratives about children of color begin and end with what Dr. Howard Stevenson and Dr. Rhonda Tsoi-A-Fatt Bryant call the "Cycle of Dehumanization."
  7. Mobile Street in Hattiesburg served as one of Mississippi's most important hubs of black entrepreneurship, professional life, commerce and, later, a crucible of civil-rights activism that would have ramifications across the state and the nation.
  8. A lawsuit accusing the City of Jackson of police brutality will move forward after a hearing on Tuesday, when Senior Hinds County Circuit Judge Tomie Green ruled that the City must hand over evidence.
  9. Anti-abortion activists in Jackson claim in a new lawsuit that they have a "right" to "congregate," "shout" and approach patients outside the abortion clinic in Fondren "without first obtaining their consent."
  10. Mississippians will no longer have to pay a sales tax when they buy Mississippi-grown foods at the grocery store if Rickey Cole, the Democrat running for the state's top agriculture position, gets his way.

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